Labour Day (Labor Day in the USA) is an annual holiday to celebrate the achievements of workers. Labour Day has its origins in the labour union movement, specifically the eight-hour day movement, which advocated eight hours for work, eight hours for recreation, and eight hours for rest. For many countries, Labour Day is synonymous with, or linked with, International Workers' Day, which occurs on 1 May. For other countries, Labour Day is celebrated on a different date, (often the last weekend of August in the US, often called Labour Day weekend) often one with special significance for the labour movement in that country. In Canada, Labour Day is the first Monday of September and considered the official end of the summer holiday for most of the country, as public school and university students return to school that week or the following week. (Parliament normally also begins its new session after the holiday, except in cases of prorogation.)

International Workers' Day

For many countries, "Labour Day" is synonymous with, or linked with, International Workers' Day, which occurs on 1 May. Some countries vary the actual date of their celebrations so that the holiday occurs on a Monday close to 1 May. The remainder of this article addresses those countries for whom Labour Day is not linked to International Workers' Day.

 

Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labour_Day

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In 1999, Robbie Steward fell in love and bought an East Vancouver heritage home brimming with original character and charm.

“The house was built in 1946… it is a unique, beautifully restored historic home with a great floor plan,” says Steward. “As a bonus it also sits on a great sized lot.”

Over the last few years, the 53-year-old and his partner Rodney Tolhuysen started to contemplate retirement.

“After raising three teens and now being empty nesters we started to consider selling,” he adds. “But then we both decided we love the neighbourhood too much to leave. We also like the fact that we are only 15 minutes from downtown, Kitsilano, the airport and the entrance to the highway.

So rather than sell and move into a condominium, they opted to have a laneway home built behind the main house.

They hired Smallworks, a developer with extensive experience in building this type of home.

“We went from a large family home to a 640 square feet, two-level laneway house,” he says.

It’s been a year and a half now and they couldn’t be happier. They found numerous ways to maximize the space with multi-purpose components and custom-designed built-ins.

 

Read more: http://www.rew.ca/news/why-youre-seeing-so-many-laneway-houses

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Vancouver’s legendary Stanley Park turns 125 this weekend and the city is throwing the popular landmark a birthday party packed full of music, historical tours, sports and nature displays.

There will be five festival zones in the 400-hectare park to mark the anniversary.

Second Beach will host a full line-up of musical performances, food concessions, outdoor sports and a beer garden.

The Arch will have a family-friendly stage with performances by local children’s entertainers, Coast Salish artisans and cultural displays.

There will be historical tours and displays in the rose garden and ticketed performances such as Theatre Under the Stars at Malkin Bowl and Boca del Lupo at the Stanley Park Service Yard parking lot.

The Brockton Sportsapalooza will feature rugby and cricket games, as well as demonstrations within a licensed area. There will also be an open house at the HMCS Discovery at Deadman’s Island.

Read more: http://globalnews.ca/news/798959/stanley-park-celebrates-125th-birthday-with-family-friendly-festival/

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(Special) - Summertime in Canada almost inevitably is synonymous with home renovations. Drive through any residential neighborhood and you'll likely see refuse bins on front lawns, graders, work trucks and trades people working.

According to Canada Mortgage and Housing's home purchase survey, some 1.7 million households surveyed performed some form of renovation in 2011 and renovation spending across the 10 major centres surveyed amounted to $20.9 billion.

The vibrant home renovation market is being fuelled by low interest rates and government tax credits.

"The continuing drive to renovate has been supported by historically low interest rates and sustained house price gains which have facilitated household borrowing," says a recent Canadian renovation market report by Scotiabank Economics. "Temporary government renovation tax credits introduced in the wake of the 2008 recession also fuelled spending and likely pulled forward some projects."

While renovating your home may improve your lifestyle and add value to what for most Canadians is their largest single asset, the majority of Canadians may not be aware of the insurance implications of giving their living space a facelift.

"Whether you're installing water-efficient plumbing or simply new cabinetry, before you pick up a hammer or drill it's important to understand and learn more about the insurance implications of upgrading your home," says Dave Minor, a vice president at TD Insurance. "While being handy around the house is convenient for upgrades such as painting or installing crown molding, more challenging projects like tackling the electrical work yourself could actually invalidate your insurance policy."

 

Read more: http://money.ca.msn.com/insurance/insight/home-renovations-can-affect-insurance

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In 1912, the Canadian Pacific Railway decided to move its main marshalling yard out of Vancouver to Coquitlam, which had plenty of raw land and much cheaper taxes.

Real estate speculators went wild. An ad in the Coquitlam Star newspaper declared, “What Pittsburgh is to the United States, so will Coquitlam be to Canada!”

A fabulous colour poster in a “Progress Number” of the same paper shows what civic boosters envisioned. There are vignettes of the coming city’s industrial factories, its railway, its busy port, and its lush farms. The Panama Canal was being built at the time and people thought the west coast would soon benefit from increased trade.

But the local money men quickly realized that the real estate boom was only around the CP Rail yards. They decided to separate the booming part from the larger district.

So, 100 years ago today — March 7, 1913 — Port Coquitlam was incorporated.


The population of the fledgling city was less than 2,000, but Alderman John Langan boldly predicted that by 1917 it would be 18,000 to 20,000. He even stated that “Port Coquitlam will advance to meet Vancouver, and probably absorb that city.”

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Port+Coquitlam+turns/8058871/story.html

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Bring your family to a picnic at Rocky Point. A day of activities, family friendly races and entertainment!. Our younger residents are invited to join in games and races following a performance by Charlotte Diamond. The Pids, Wall Street and ABRA Cadabra will play through the afternoon and into the night. Children's races include egg & spoon, three legged races, and sack races. Afternoon activities include puppet show, wandering magician, face painting, unicycle demonstration, tug of war, teen activities in the skate park, volleyball and badminton. Bring your own food or purchase it on site. Don't forget your chairs, blankets and umbrellas. This free event is hosted by local favourite Tony Prophet. For fun we invite you to wear fashions from any decade over the past century.  At 9:30pm fireworks will close the night. Fireworks production is brought to you by Celebration of Lights two-time Grand Champion.

 

Read more: http://www.portmoody.ca/index.aspx?page=288&recordid=1367

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Sunny weather did not slow the pace of home sale activity in July. Last month was the highest selling month of the year in Greater Vancouver and the highest selling July since 2009.

The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential property sales in Greater Vancouver reached 2,946 on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in July 2013. This represents a 40.4 per cent increase compared to the 2,098 sales recorded in July 2012, and an 11.5 per cent increase compared to the 2,642 sales in June 2013.

Last month’s sales were 0.1 per cent above the 10-year sales average for the month.

“Demand has strengthened in our market in the last few months, which can, in part, be attributed to pent-up demand from the slowdown in sales activity we saw at the end of last year,” Sandra Wyant, REBGV president said. 

New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Greater Vancouver totalled 4,854 in July. This represents a 1.1 per cent increase compared to the 4,802 new listings reported in July 2012 and a 0.4 per cent decline from the 4,874 new listings in June of this year.

The total number of properties currently listed for sale on the MLS® in Greater Vancouver is 16,618, which is an 8.1 per cent decrease compared to July 2012 and a 3.9 per cent decline from June 2013.

The sales-to-active-listings ratio rose two and-a-half percentage points between June and July to 17.7 per cent in Greater Vancouver. This is the highest this ratio has been in Greater Vancouver since April 2012.

The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Greater Vancouver is currently $601,900. This represents a decline of 2.3 per cent compared to this time last year and an increase of 2.3 per cent over the last six months.

“Home prices continue to experience considerable stability with minimal fluctuation throughout much of this year,” Wyant said. “This stability in price brings greater certainty to the home buying and selling process.”

 

Read more: http://www.rebgv.org/monthly-reports?month=July&year=2013

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Centennial Community Block Parties - Host a party in your neighbourhood!
Host your own Centennial Event! City of Port Moody is offering a limited number of $100 grants for your community block party. Bring neighbours together, celebrate City of Port Moody Centennial year and help build communities by having a community block party. In addition to the grant the City provides you with a Centennial promotional package for your approved block party. Block parties are a great way to encourage neighbours to connect and improve their community. You do not have to live in a district of single family homes to be involved in a block party. Block parties can happen in common spaces of townhouse complexes, in front of apartment buildings, or in a nearby park. A block party is a group of neighbours working together to organize an event for their residential neighbourhood. Apply today. Fill out a permit application found on the Centennial – Get Involved webpage.

Port Moody Centennial Youth Arts Festival, July 26-27
Join us for the 2nd Annual Port Moody Arts Festival! This engaging festival features local talent, ages 13-18 years old. Bands, dancers, films and visual art.

Community Picnic & Fireworks Celebrating Port Moody's Centennial, August 17
Bring your family to a picnic at Rocky Point. A day of activities, family friendly races and entertainment! Our younger residents are invited to join in games and races following a performance by Charlotte Diamond. The Pids, Wall Street and ABRA Cadabra will play through the afternoon and into the night when fireworks will close the event. Fireworks production is brought to you by Celebration of Lights two-time Grand Champion.

Day On The Water - Centennial Event Celebrating Our Waterfront Community, August 17
Port Moody waterfront community organizations plan a day of water and land activities. Dragon boat rides; sailing demos & races; safety demos; Flavelle Boom Boat demos. Participating in the event are: Nothin Dragon, Abreast in a Boat, Rocky Point sailing, Inlet Rowing Club, Canadian Power Squadron and Old Mill Boathouse.

 

Read more: http://www.portmoody.ca/index.aspx?page=696

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The weather is a constant source of conversation in Canada and a bone of contention.  Every spring we see flooding occur across the country.  The Prairies encounter flooding frequently during the spring and every fall, Eastern Canada gets hammered with tropical storms and hurricanes.  After all of these events we have to deal with the after-effects: mould.

Mould is everywhere.  The small spores are floating in the air you’re breathing even as you read this.  It’s a ubiquitous part of nature.  These microscopic spores float through the air, landing on surfaces.  If the conditions are not favourable for growth, nothing happens.  But when they land on a surface with the right conditions – dampness and a suitable food source, such as wood or other organic material – a problem will soon occur.

When a spore lands on a suitable surface it begins to grow roots, stem and finally a head, which produces many spores in as little as 12 hours, given the right conditions.  These spores are caught by air currents and can then spread.

The spores are small – a typical mould spore is only around three to 40 microns in diameter.  To understand just how small this is, consider that human hairs measure between 30 and 120 microns in diameter.

Spores can travel very easily, seeking new places to grow.  Sometimes they travel throughout a building using the ventilation system or natural air movement and spread, settling on surfaces, waiting for the opportunity to grow.  Others don’t travel far, if the air movement isn’t favourable.  In these cases, you can have large colonies growing in a relatively confined area in a short period of time.  Each plant produces many spores, which create more growth, which creates more spores…and it goes on until either the food is gone or the conditions change.

Read more: 

http://www.remonline.com/mould-mould-everywhere/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Mould%2C+mould+everywhere&utm_source=YMLP&utm_term

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Some lucky guys and gals travel to a luxury summer home every year, decamping to the mountains or beach for a change of scenery. Not everyone can afford a vacation house, but small changes can make a room in your own home feel calm, relaxed, cool and inviting -- just like you'd feel if you took a million-dollar retreat.

Summer is the time to lighten the weight of fabrics and add cheerful colors inside to celebrate the arrival of the season. Extend your living area outside, and connect with your surroundings. Plant flowers in window boxes, and fill bowls on your kitchen countertop with fresh produce from the farmers market. Rearrange a space and make it more comfortable for the hot summer months.

Whether your décor projects happen indoors or outside, they'll refresh your space and make you feel like a special guest in your own home. Summer is a lighthearted, playful time of year, and with a little time and effort, your home can reflect this carefree attitude. Here are 10 ideas to get you in the spirit of the season.

 

10: Move the Living Room Outside

Who says your back porch or patio shouldn't mirror your indoor living room?

During the warm summer months, outdoor spaces should be a continuation of your interiors. Move your living room outside this summer, and arrange seating to encourage guests to sit, socialize and relax. Make outdoor chairs and ottomans comfortable with fluffy pillows and cushions lined in weather-resistant fabric, and place a rug made of durable material under furniture that can be hosed off for cleaning. Accessorize the area like you would any of your indoor rooms -- art, mirrors and wall clocks will make an exterior room look complete. Add end tables and a coffee table for convenient places to set food and drinks, and install outdoor lighting, like lamps, sconces and ceiling fans to use after the sun goes down.

To create the ultimate outdoor living room, add fabric panels to an arbor in your backyard to make your own personal cabana. Lounging on low-seated chairs, floor cushions and daybeds will inspire the mood for a party. Stock a pantry made out of an old hutch or cabinet with candles, matches, plastic plates, cups, barware, napkins and a few serving pieces for an impromptu celebration. Install an outdoor fireplace or a freestanding fire pit to help guests stay warm on cool, early summer evenings, and set up a sturdy dining table and chairs for casual family meals or other social gatherings. After dining al fresco at the outdoor dining table on a perfect summer evening with friends, roast marshmallows in the fireplace and enjoy delicious s'mores while playing a competitive game of Monopoly under the stars.

 

Read more: http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/10-summer-decorating-ideas.htm

 

 

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The 2011 Census released on February 7, 2012 revealed that Port Moody has a population of approximately 34,000 and also showed that it is one of the fastest growing cities in B.C.

It seems a good time to give a history primer for the newcomers and a refresher for the old timers.

When you visit the City Hall/Library complex at 100 Newport Drive, have a look at the Port Moody coat-of-arms on display in the Galleria. They are on the wall above the doors leading to the Council Chambers. It was designed by former Mayor David Driscoll. It shows our mountains, trees and water and the words “Blest by Nature – Enriched by Man”.

The water is Burrard Inlet named by Captain Vancouver while on his mapping expedition in 1792. The inlet was used by the Salish Indians canoeing to their summer/fall encampments east of present Rocky Point Park. They came for shellfish, deer hunting and berry picking. They left evidence of these activities (shells, bones, kitchen utensils) in their middens (European word for garbage dump). When you walk the Shoreline Trail, you are walking on top of some of the middens which can be many feet deep.

After Captain Vancouver’s visit, there were no Europeans in the area until Col. R.C. Moody came to the Colony of British Columbia in 1858 with a detachment of Royal engineers (sappers). They were encamped at Sappertown (Sapperton). He had a great number of tasks. One was to safeguard the Colony from any American encounters caused by their Civil War which started in 1861. His fleet of man-of-war on the Fraser River supporting Fort Langley needed safe winter anchorage, he chose Burrard Inlet. In 1859 he cleared a military supply road directly north from Sappertown to Burrard Inlet – hence the “North Road”. 

 

Read more: http://www.portmoody.ca/index.aspx?page=698

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Who doesn't like a parade?

That's what organizers in the City of Arts are counting on, as Port Moody gets set to host the first parade in the community in four decades. As part of its 100th birthday, the city will host a centennial-themed parade on Saturday, June 22.

"I'm just absolutely thrilled. With the centennial, it's given us an opportunity to budget some money and get some grant money and hold a big parade," said Coun. Diana Dilworth, a member of the organizing committee.

She noted Port Moody is the only municipality in the Lower Mainland that doesn't have a community parade.

The parade will start at the Port Moody Recreation Centre at 11 a.m., and move along Ioco Road to Murray Street before winding down in Rocky Point Park. The entire route is about two kilometres long.

"It's a nice, straight flat route for the most part, and we're really encouraging everyone to come out to Murray Street and watch the parade," Dilworth said.

Organizers are hoping for roughly 100 entries - everything from floats and bands to community groups and clowns.

 

 

Read more: 

http://www.thenownews.com/community/Port+Moody+plans+parade+mark+centennial/8460105/story.html

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While the number of home sales in Greater Vancouver continued to trend below the 10-year average in May, the balance of sales and listings meant continued market stability this spring.

The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential property sales in Greater Vancouver reached 2,882 on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in May 2013. This represents a one per cent increase compared to the 2,853 sales recorded in May 2012, and a 9.7 per cent increase compared to the 2,627 sales in April 2013.

Last month’s sales were 19.4 per cent below the 10-year sales average for the month, while new listings for the month were 7.4 percent below the 10-year average.

“We’ve seen some steadying trends over the last three months,” Sandra Wyant, REBGV president said. “The number of homes listed for sale has been keeping pace with the number of property sales, leading to a balanced sales-to-listings ratio. This is having a stabilizing influence on home price activity.”

New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Greater Vancouver totalled 5,656 in May. This represents an 18.3 per cent decline compared to the 6,927 new listings reported in May 2012 and a 3.7 per cent decline from the 5,876 new listings in April of this year.

The total number of properties currently listed for sale on the MLS® in Greater Vancouver is 17,222, a 3.4 per cent decrease compared to May 2012 and a 2.9 per cent increase compared to April 2013.

The sales-to-active-listings ratio currently sits at 17 per cent in Greater Vancouver. This is the third straight month that this ratio has been above 15 per cent. Previous to this, May 2012 was the last time this ratio was above 15 per cent.

 

Read more: http://www.rebgv.org/monthly-reports?month=May&year=2013

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Saturday, June 1, 2013
9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Theme: Mad Hatter's Tea Party

Parade 10:00 AM
Street Festival 11:00 AM

Hats Off Day takes place along Hastings Street between Boundary Road and Gamma Avenue. Join us as our streets get packed with families, friends, neighbours, and merchants! The parade begins at 10:00 AM along Hastings Street from Beta Avenue to Boundary Road and the street festival kicks off at 11:00 AM with lots of music, food and kids activities.

 

Hats Off Day is when Heights merchants "take their hats off" to their community and their customers, and the entire Heights community celebrates together. It's a huge, one-day extravaganza featuring a colourful main-street style parade with real local flavour, and a big street party afterwards.

 

Read more: http://www.burnaby.ca/Things-To-Do/Festivals-and-Events/Hats-Off-Day.html

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If you're starting to feel like you've got too much house, you should consider the following downsizing tips. Some people thrive living alone, but many mistakenly think that living independently keeps them thriving, and that just isn’t so, says seniors real estate specialist Shelley Williams. Living in a house can contribute to isolation, feelings of helplessness, and contrary to popular thought, a loss of independence, especially if you need help from neighbours. A one or two bedroom condo not only offers less isolation, it’s a lot less work to maintain. We give you other things to consider when making the decision.

 

It won’t happen overnight


When making the transition from house to apartment, it is about a two-year process, so think ahead, advises realtor Shelley Williams.

“Unlike most deals, where the realtor finds the buyer a house, negotiates the deal and presents the contract, the process with a senior is much longer and more comprehensive.”

Some people have a house that needs top-to-bottom de-cluttering before they can even think about moving.

“Some of them have 30 years of stuff in the basement,” says Williams.

Then there’s the lengthy process it takes to find a new place, which will need to work with what you need and, in the case of older residents, will need to be senior-friendly.


Consider your needs and resources

How soon would you like to move? How much can you afford to pay for a place? How much space do you need? Would you like a view or pet-friendly building? Are there relatives or friends who can help with de-cluttering and moving?

“Once I find out what makes sense for them, then we start to make arrangements to poke around and look at properties,” says Williams.

 

Read more: http://money.ca.msn.com/retirement/gallery/eight-things-you-should-know-about-downsizing


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The 2011 Census released on February 7, 2012 revealed that Port Moody has a population of approximately 34,000 and also showed that it is one of the fastest growing cities in B.C.

It seems a good time to give a history primer for the newcomers and a refresher for the old timers.

When you visit the City Hall/Library complex at 100 Newport Drive, have a look at the Port Moody coat-of-arms on display in the Galleria. They are on the wall above the doors leading to the Council Chambers. It was designed by former Mayor David Driscoll. It shows our mountains, trees and water and the words “Blest by Nature – Enriched by Man”.

The water is Burrard Inlet named by Captain Vancouver while on his mapping expedition in 1792. The inlet was used by the Salish Indians canoeing to their summer/fall encampments east of present Rocky Point Park. They came for shellfish, deer hunting and berry picking. They left evidence of these activities (shells, bones, kitchen utensils) in their middens (European word for garbage dump). When you walk the Shoreline Trail, you are walking on top of some of the middens which can be many feet deep. 

 

Read more: http://www.portmoody.ca/index.aspx?page=698

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Victoria Day (in French: Fête de la Reine) is a federal Canadian public holiday celebrated on the last Monday before May 25, in honour of Queen Victoria's birthday. The date is also, simultaneously, that on which the current reigning Canadian sovereign's official birthday is recognized. It is sometimes informally considered as marking the beginning of the summer season in Canada.

The holiday has been observed since before Canada was formed, originally falling on the sovereign's actual birthday, and continues to be celebrated in various fashions across the country on the fixed date; the holiday has always been a distinctly Canadian observance.[1][2] It is a statutory holiday federally, as well as in six of Canada's ten provinces and all three of its territories. In Quebec, the same day was, since the Quiet Revolution, unofficially known as Fête de Dollard until 2003, when provincial legislation officially named the same date as Victoria Day the National Patriots' Day.

History

The birthday of Queen Victoria was a day for celebration in Canada long before Confederation, with the first legislation regarding the event being in 1845 passed by the parliament of the Province of Canada to officially recognize May 24 as the Queen's birthday.[3][1][2] It was noted that on that date in 1854, the 35th birthday of Queen Victoria, some 5,000 residents of Canada West gathered in front of Government House (near present day King and Simcoe Streets in Toronto) to "give cheers to their queen."[4] On May 24, 1866, the town of Omemee, also in Canada West, mounted a day-long fête to mark the occasion, including a gun salute at midnight, pre-dawn serenades, picnics, athletic competitions, a display of illuminations, and a torch-light procession;[5] such events were common around the colony and,[1] by the 1890s, the day had become a "patriotic holiday".[2]

Victoria Day, 1854; crowds gather outside Government House in Toronto, Canada West (now Ontario)

Following the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, May 24 was made by law to be known as Victoria Day,[3][1] a date to remember the late queen, who was deemed the "Mother of Confederation",[6] and, in 1904, the same date was by imperial decree made Empire Day throughout the British Empire.[1] Over the ensuing decades, the official date in Canada of the reigning sovereign's birthday changed through various royal proclamations until the haphazard format was abandoned in 1952. That year, both Empire Day and Victoria Day were, by order-in-council and statutory amendment, respectively, moved to the Monday before May 25 and the monarch's official birthday in Canada was by regular viceregal proclamations made to fall on this same date every year between 1953 and January 31, 1957,[3][7] when the link was made permanent by royal proclamation.[3][8] The following year, Empire Day was renamed Commonwealth Day and in 1977 it was moved to the second Monday in March, leaving the Monday before May 25 only as both Victoria Day and the Queen's Birthday.

Victoria Day celebrations were marred by tragedy in 1881, when a passenger ferry named Victoria overturned in the Thames River, near London, Ontario. The boat departed in the evening with 600 to 800 people on board— three times the allowable passenger capacity— and capsized part way across the river, drowning some 182 individuals, including a large number of children who had been with their families for Victoria Day picnics at Springbank Park. The event came to be known as the Victoria Day disaster.[9]

 

Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Day

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The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) released its 2013 Second Quarter Housing Forecast on May 8, 2013.

For the Greater Vancouver area, BCREA is forecasting a 4.5 per cent increase to 26,600 MLS® residential sales for 2013 and an increase of 10.5 per cent for 2014. The average MLS® residential price is forecast to remain virtually unchanged through 2014 and 2015.

"Stricter mortgage credit regulation combined with slower economic growth has kept BC home sales at a cyclical low over the past three quarters," said Cameron Muir, BCREA Chief Economist. "However, a faster growing economy is expected during the second half of the year and through 2014 which will support a growth trend in provincial housing demand.

"BC average home price forecast is revised upward for 2013, from a decline of 1 per cent to remaining unchanged, as a result of stronger than expected market conditions in Vancouver," added Muir. The average MLS® residential price in BC is forecast at $515,800 this year, before rising 1.7 per cent to $524,500 in 2014. 

 

Read more: 

http://members.rebgv.org/realtorlink/rebgv/publications/RLzine/RL_may172013/files/Forecast.html

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Contrary to popular belief, Mother's Day was not conceived and fine-tuned in the boardroom of Hallmark. The earliest tributes to mothers date back to the annual spring festival the Greeks dedicated to Rhea, the mother of many deities, and to the offerings ancient Romans made to their Great Mother of Gods, Cybele. Christians celebrated this festival on the fourth Sunday in Lent in honor of Mary, mother of Christ. In England this holiday was expanded to include all mothers and was called Mothering Sunday.

In the United States, Mother's Day started nearly 150 years ago, when Anna Jarvis, an Appalachian homemaker, organized a day to raise awareness of poor health conditions in her community, a cause she believed would be best advocated by mothers. She called it "Mother's Work Day."

Fifteen years later, Julia Ward Howe, a Boston poet, pacifist, suffragist, and author of the lyrics to the "Battle Hymn of the Republic," organized a day encouraging mothers to rally for peace, since she believed they bore the loss of human life more harshly than anyone else.

In 1905 when Anna Jarvis died, her daughter, also named Anna, began a campaign to memorialize the life work of her mother. Legend has it that young Anna remembered a Sunday school lesson that her mother gave in which she said, "I hope and pray that someone, sometime, will found a memorial mother's day. There are many days for men, but none for mothers." 

 

Read more: http://mothers-day.123holiday.net/

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